London and the Restoration, 1659-1683 by Gary S. De Krey

By Gary S. De Krey

This finished research of political and spiritual conflicts examines the problem to recovery associations by means of Protestant dissent within the London of Charles II's reign. It provides liberty of sense of right and wrong because the maximum political factor of the recovery and explains how the competition among dissenters and Anglicans contributed to the advance of events in 1679-83 that unsettled the kingdom.

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London and the Restoration, 1659-1683

This complete research of political and spiritual conflicts examines the problem to recovery associations by way of Protestant dissent within the London of Charles II's reign. It offers liberty of sense of right and wrong because the maximum political factor of the recovery and explains how the competition among dissenters and Anglicans contributed to the advance of events in 1679-83 that unsettled the kingdom.

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This citty is sicke of its new militia,” wrote one royalist observer, whose views reflected the popular fear that “vast sommes of mony by . . 12 A “royalist” insurrection began on 1 August. It involved skirmishes in several counties and the seizure of Chester by Sir George Booth, who had been among those turned away from his seat at Westminster. Although this effort collapsed within a few weeks, the Rump and the army had to contend simultaneously with a national military crisis and with a capital in which disenchantment had turned to active disaffection.

These were, according to all Presbyterians, the likely consequences of the sectarian agenda of full toleration. Not surprisingly, therefore, Sir George Booth’s Chester rising was actively supported by some “illustrious Presbyterian ministers” of London, like Zachary Crofton of St Botolph Aldgate. ” The idea of promoting a petition for a free parliament in the London common council may also have originated with the Presbyterian clergy. 20 Despite the regime’s survival of this first test of its strength, neither the tensions between pragmatic and dogmatic MPs (allied to the army) nor the tensions between the Rump and the Corporation had been eased.

24 London and the Restoration, 1659–1683 If few London citizens were prepared to resist the Rump in August 1659, many citizens nevertheless voiced their support for a free parliament – instead of the Rump – as the only path to settlement. Despite the military bustle about them in early August, and despite the charges of treason in the rhetorical air, London Presbyterians pursued their petition and apparently redirected it toward Booth’s objective of a new, freely elected parliament. When Lord Mayor Ireton refused to summon a common council to consider a petition, those who desired one sought to convene common council without mayoral summons in accordance with the Rump’s own 1649 London statute.

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